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NASA’s Juno spacecraft snapped this shot of Jupiter’s giant storm known as the Little Red Spot (lower left).

Like Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, the little spot is a persistent weather storm on Jupiter’s surface. Despite its size, the little red spot still packs a punch, with wind speeds of 400 MPH.

The Little Red Spot is the second largest storm on Jupiter, roughly 70% the size of the Earth, and it started turning red in late-2005. The clouds in the Little Red Spot rotate counterclockwise, or in the anticyclonic direction, because it is a high-pressure region. In that sense, the Little Red Spot is the opposite of a hurricane on Earth, which is a low-pressure region – and, of course, the Little Red Spot is far larger than any hurricane on Earth.

The image was captured on on Dec. 11, 2016 as the spacecraft performed a close flyby of the gas giant planet. The spacecraft was at an altitude of 10,300 miles (16,600 kilometers) above Jupiter’s cloud tops.

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